Sensorial Objects was an exhibition of work by Faculty from the OCAD University Fibre Studio. The exhibition ran from March 6-May 2, 2015 at the Craft Ontario Gallery, Toronto


Curatorial Statement:

Artefacts carry the unique power of being repositories of sensory experience. Rather than just perceived visually, they engage a range of sensations, and invite intimate and affective interaction. As such, material objects broaden the aesthetic encounter, and open the door to investigations of sensuality, material, process, interactivity, and culture (Owen, 2011).


Sensory experience is a potent counterpoint to rampant hyperconsumption that characterizes present-day material culture. Sensorial objects request an attentive involvement from an audience, and encourage a reflective encounter. They shake us from the habitual impulse of insatiable consumption, and offer an experience of the world that is felt with the whole of the body (Pallasmaa, 2005). By experiencing an object through its tactile, olfactory, auditory, and/or visual properties, the work of the maker stands apart from that which is hastily produced, consumed and abandoned. Positioned as such, these objects draw attention to a renewed role for making, and hold clues to future pathways for human relationships with material culture.


Exhibiting artists:

MONICA BODIRSKY
EVA ENNIST
ANA GALINDO
LYNNE HELLER
CHUNG IM KIM
RACHEL MACHENRY
DORIE MILLERSON
KATHLEEN MORRIS
MEGHAN PRICE
LAURIE WASSINK


Sensorial Objects was generously supported by the Ontario Arts Council

white felted wool textile, wall-mounted   ···  

In the language of landscape

The title of this work draws on the writings of David Abram, whose seminal book, The Spell of the Sensuous, looks at how humans relate to a “more than human world."


The sounds, smells, visions, and textures that characterize a primal affiliation between the human and animate world constitutes its own language. Far from the printed word, this is a language of utterances and gestures, the rhythm of birdsong, the taste of morning, the flicker of shadows.


I consider the corporeal act of making as one closely connected to this primal language. A soft handful of fleece is spongey in my hand; my spine curves in the act of slow and rhythmic wrapping. The act of making--the work’s protracted unfolding-- becomes an invitation to the body to reunite with the living landscape.

felted and sculpted wool   ···  
felted and sculpted wool   ···  
felted and sculpted wool   ···  
felted and sculpted wool   ···  
felted and sculpted wool   ···  
felted and sculpted wool   ···  
felted and sculpted wool   ···  
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Using Format